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Hurricane Katrina

Essay by   •  December 12, 2011  •  Research Paper  •  1,273 Words (6 Pages)  •  1,770 Views

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Hurricane Katrina

On August 29, 2005 the United States witnessed one of its worst tragedies

that left our nation in devastation and uncertain, concerning our well beings in this

country. The people of New Orleans were more severely affected than any other

city that under went the powerful Hurricane Katrina. It was a nightmare that

caused many deaths, homelessness, and dissolution among the many Americas that

resided in New Orleans and surrounding areas.

Born in the Atlantic Ocean, Hurricane Katrina started her first appearance

in Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, and Cuba. As she continued to make her way, Katrina

grew bigger as she moves through the Gulf of Mexico towards Grand Isle,

Louisiana. Finally she ended up right above New Orleans and maked her biggest

debut yet. As Katrina continued her job as a Hurricane she passes over Lake

Pontchartrain and causes as much as twenty feet of water to be dumped in New

Orleans.

Many people had evacuated the city prior to the arrival of Katrina, but

others were unsure of the severity of the Hurricane and decided to not leave their

homes, which sadly increased the numbers of deaths that occurred from the

undependable levees and under sea- level city. Others seeked shelter at the New

Orleans Super Dome that housed 50,000 people a day before Hurricane Katrina

arrived. Once Katrina moved on, thousands more came afterward that increased

the estimated number to some 500,000 residents of New Orleans. The Super Dome

became many residents' of New Orleans homes. While the government was

taking its time in trying to figure out what to do, the stranded people of the

Dome were in disbelief and wondered when their fellow Americas were going to

step up and support them in their time of need. The Super Dome was horrific and

people were condemned to live this way. Even though this was the place where

they went to seek shelter, the roof was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina and there

was no running water. Food was nonexistent and people even fought to stay alive,

even though the Hurricane had disappeared back into the Atlantic Ocean.

The residents of New Orleans were let down by the American Government

not making any effort to support their needs and help the victims of this

horrific tragedy. The Homeland Security Operations Center constantly went back

and forth concerning what should be done in the event of a tragedy that was so

outstanding and overwhelming that could not get the government to act swiftly.

Many excuses were brought to play as the Mayor of New Orleans continued to

fight for the people and was not taken seriously for his roll as Mayor. Every

attempt he pursed was shot down by Homeland Security and the government.

He broadcasted his feelings nationally and exposed the truth about the nation and

how nothing had been done for the people of New Orleans to help them overcome

this disaster.

This natural disaster was magnified enormously by the governments

crushing incompetence in both preparation and response. The storm leveled the

Mississippi Gulf Coast, but man-made problems destroyed New Orleans. The

catarophic flooding there should never have happened. Properly designed and

constructed levees would have protected the city, instead they collapsed. Never

in American history was a natural disaster so fatally coupled with the systemic

failure of our government to protect and serve the people. The result is the

national tragedy known forevermore as Hurricane Katrina. (The Storm p.p. 109-

110)

As the United States continued to watch helplessly by the television many

people banded together to get some action started to help the victims of Hurricane

Katrina. Many groups

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